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Breast Reduction Scar Treatment

There’s more than one type of incision (and more than one type of scar)

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“Breast reduction, which is done to reduce the size of a woman’s breasts, usually includes removing skin and/or the breast tissue beneath it,” Gordon Lee, M.D., a plastic and breast reconstructive surgeon at Stanford Health Care, tells SELF. There are three incision types to do just that. Which one your surgeon chooses largely depends on how much excess skin and breast tissue needs to be removed. If you only need a small amount taken out, there’s the circumareolar incision—also known as a doughnut incision—which involves cutting around the areola and removing some of the surrounding excess skin. If you need to remove more loose skin and tissue than that, the next level up is the lollipop incision, which leaves a scar around areola and a second scar that goes straight down from the base of the areola. “When you sew it together, the final shape is like a lollipop,” says Lee. For more extensive reductions, there’s the Wise pattern, which has the same two incisions as the lollipop and an additional scar that runs along the underside, or crease, of the breast, creating a scar that resembles an anchor. In some cases, surgeons also tack on liposuction to help reduce breast tissue.*

During the formation of scars, the epidermal layers of the skin will produce high levels of moisture in an attempt to hydrate the scar site. However, most of this moisture evaporates once it reaches the stratum corneum, or upper layer of the skin. This moisture loss triggers keratinocytes in the skin to produce collagen. Left unchecked, excessive collagen production can lead to abnormal scarring.

Silicone Gel Sheeting in procedure specific configurations fully encapsulates the scar site, meaning that it completely covers the treatment site for even distribution of necessary moisture (hydration), and maximum exposure to oxygen. Although the entire site is covered, silicone is semipermeable, allowing oxygen to enter while maintaining necessary moisture. This is called “homeostasis,” otherwise known as an ideal healing environment.

Epi-Derm Silicone Gel Sheeting, provided by Contemporary Design Inc. is an ideal healing environment at the stratum corneum signals keratinocytes to scale back the production of collagen, thereby preventing abnormal scarring.

*http://www.self.com/wellness/2016/03/8-things-women-should-know-about-breast-reduction-surgery-but-dont/

Just in time for the Easter Bunny…a New Look at Chocolate

Although chocolate may not cure cellulite or sagging breasts, new research does find it good for the brain.  easterch
The latest news on chocolate couldn’t have been sweeter:  it benefits the brain! Results of an international study – the researchers were from Australia, Maine and Luxembourg – suggested that people who eat chocolate at least once a week performed better on a series of neuropsychological tests than people in the study who didn’t consume chocolate at least once a week. The tests revealed that those who enjoyed the most chocolate among the study’s 968 participants showed improved visual-spatial memory and abstract reasoning compared to those who consumed less chocolate. The researchers theorized that the flavanols (antioxidants) in chocolate were responsible for the brain boost, just as these compounds seem to be for improvements in blood flow associated with chocolate. How much chocolate should you eat to help sharpen your memory or hone your abstract reasoning? And what kind of chocolate would be best for these purposes? Unfortunately, those questions weren’t addressed. This study may not have fully satisfied the yen for good news about chocolate, but previous animal studies have documented the protective effects of flavanol consumption on cognition, and other investigators have reported similar benefits in humans. Stay tuned.

read more at: e-bulletins@communications.drweil.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/behindtheheadlines/news/2016-03-09-can-chocolate-make-you-smarter/

My Beautiful Mommy

my beautiful mommy

Dr. Michael Salzhauer, a renowned plastic surgeon, wrote My Beautiful Mommy to help patients explain their transformation to their children. The story guides children through Mommy’s surgery and healing process in a friendly, nonthreatening way.

Through vivid illustrations and straightforward dialogue, My Beautiful Mommy explains a parent s physical transformation in a breezy, child-friendly manner from a young child s perspective. You and your child will follow along as Mommy goes through her plastic surgery experience and learn how the entire family pitches in to help Mommy achieve her beautiful results.

If you are a mother with young children and thinking about having plastic surgery – this book is a must have.

Undergoing a plastic surgery procedure can be an exciting and stressful time for you and your family. After you ve picked a board-certified plastic surgeon and a surgery date, take a few minutes to read through this book with your child.

This book will make your plastic surgery experience more understandable to your little ones.
Information For Parents: Plastic surgery has become extremely common among mothers with young children. In 2007 more than 400,000 women with young children underwent elective cosmetic surgery in the U.S. alone.

As any parent will tell you – children are very perceptive. It is nearly impossible to hide a plastic surgery transformation from your children. In my years of experience, trying to do so adds additional and unnecessary stress for both parent and child. Throughout the process young children can become confused.

During the initial consultation they may ask themselves questions such as Why is Mommy going to the doctor? Is Mommy sick? If these questions are not addressed, the child will often imagine fantastical scenarios to fill in the gaps of information they are lacking. This phenomenon becomes more pronounced after the surgery.

Once mommy is home and the child sees that mommy is bandaged and bruised, they can become even more worried and inquisitive. Finally, when the bandages come off and mommy looks somewhat different, their confusion may lead to responses that adults may find inappropriate or hard to understand.

This book is designed to explain to your child what to expect – from the initial consultation to the final result. It is recommended that you read this with your child (and spouse) at least three times during the plastic surgery process: once prior to the initial consultation (if they will be coming along), once more prior to the surgery, and then again during the post-operative healing phase. Encourage your child to ask questions as you read. Answer them in an honest and straightforward manner in language they will understand.

If you follow this advice, you will be able to calm your children’s fears, address their concerns, and help your family to sail easily through the plastic surgery experience.

The review on this one is still out.  My very smart grown daughter often shares my shortcomings and the things I have done to damage her and make life less than perfect.  Yes she also speaks of the good stuff, but that seems less memorable.  Per chance this book is one of those moments that may define you. One’s definition of beauty is often informed by their mother and what she does and doesn’t like about herself. Those vulnerable years between girlhood and womanhood shouldn’t be spent wondering if my mother’s complaints about her own shortcomings (short or nonexistent eyelashes, saddle bags, crow’s feet) wouldn’t suddenly be the only things you inherited.  Think about it.

 

 

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