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Posts tagged ‘Compression Wear’

Stage 2 Male Compression Shirt

SC-175 CDI Stage 2 Male Compression Shirt

Ideal for use during the extended recovery period following gynocomastia and liposuction of the upper body. Made from our exclusive SuperSilky fabric, the CDI SC-175 offers maximum compression to the chest, upper back and flanks and upper and lower abdomen. A tapered design provides a contoured fit and allows this shirt to be worn under every day clothing, ultimately contributing to increased patient compliance and a comfortable recovery.

 

Learn more about Lymphedema

Spreading awareness of this disease’s symptoms and treatments is key to its control.  Contemporary Design, Inc. is committed to sharing the pertinent information you “need to know.”

External resources

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
P.O. Box 30105
Bethesda, MD 20824-0105
Phone: 301-592-8573
TTY: 240-629-3255
Fax: 301-592-8563
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

National Cancer Institute (NCI)
U.S. National Institutes of Health
Public Inquiries Office
Building 31, Room 10A03
31 Center Drive, MSC 8322
Bethesda, MD 20892-2580
Phone: 301-435-3848
Toll-Free: 1-800-422-6237
TTY: 1-800-332-8615
http://www.nci.nih.gov/

National Lymphedema Network
Latham Square, 1611 Telegraph Ave.
Suite 1111
Oakland, CA 94612-2138
Toll-Free: 1-800-541-3259
Phone: 510-208-3200
Fax: 510-208-3110
http://www.lymphnet.org/

Office of Rare Diseases
National Institutes of Health
6100 Executive Blvd.
Room 3B01, MSC 7518
Bethesda, MD 20892-7518
Phone: 301-402-4336
Fax: 301-480-9655
http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/

The power of You Tube – Oh My Vlog and Contemporary Design Inc. Get It.

You Tube and its impact on current affairs now has the ultimate mouth piece… Oh My Vlog magazine which launched today. Inside it has everything you need to know about your favorite YouTube vloggers – from Zoella to Tyler Oakley – and their fans.

Oh My Vlog and Contemporary Design understand the power of You Tube. Video and You Tube communicate in the most user friendly way…Excess-able to all, whenever and wherever you need.  Contemporary Design Inc. has now incorporated video as a learning tool for patients anticipating upcoming surgery, and explains the accompanying compression garments they will need.

Kathy Bates Opens Up About Her Battle With Lymphedema

Contemporary Design Inc.  Compression Garments exert 18-21 mmHg of pressure on the limb. The amount of pressure is measured in terms of “mmHg,” or millimeters of mercury, based on the amount of pressure exerted by one millimeter of liquid mercury.  (You’re probably familiar with this from your blood pressure readings, which are also expressed in terms of “mmHg.”)

Compression garments are worn by those with lymphedema on the affected limb following complete decongestive therapy.   The garment’s compression helps maintain edema reduction and compresses the arm or leg and encourage the flow of lymph fluid out of the affected limb.

Consult your healthcare provider.

Caring for your Compression Wear

 

Hand wash your Compression Wear

Hand wash your Compression Wear

CDI Compression Wear is constructed with technical fabrics designed to feel good while aiding in recovery and offering support and shaping.  Be sure to follow the care instructions to ensure you get the most from your purchase.

What is the best way to launder my CDI Compression Wear?
The least damaging way to care for your Compression wear is to hand wash. We recommend that you hand wash your compression garment in lukewarm water with a mild detergent, and then air dry. Please do not dry your garment in a gas or electric dryer, for it may ruin the garment. Drip dry, do not wring out. Delicate or synthetic fabrics tend to dry quite quickly.  To remove bloodstains, simply soak your garment in a basin of cool water mixed with a ¼ cup of peroxide.

Can I machine wash?

NO!  CDI recommend that you hand wash to extend the life of your garment to avoid damage such as straps becoming tangled by the agitator.

Can my Compression Wear be tumble dried?


Tumble drying is never recommended. Even a low heat setting damages the stretch properties of your garment and dramatically reduces the lifespan.

Wait – Is This Inside Out??? What’s So Special About Surgical Compression Wear Anyway!?!

Compression Wear is designed for Postoperative needs

Compression Wear is designed for Postoperative needs: –with outside seams,
exterior labels, and hook & eye beneath zippers for easy application

Why are compression garments important to the success of my surgery?

These garments are designed to protect what is inside!

-No scratchy tags inside to irritate the already sensitive skin.

-No indents visible on the skin from the impression of an inside seam.

-No undue stress to the incision site while zipping into the garment.

Wearing a high quality post-op compression garment can help you during the recovery process in the following ways: To provide uniform radial compression and support to aid recovery. Wearing a compression garment designed for your particular procedure will minimize bruising and swelling (edema), increase blood circulation in the affected area and aid in flushing fluids and toxins at the incision site. The compression from the garment will hold skin firmly in place, aiding in proper skin retraction and intended body contouring. In addition, outside seams on the garment, will prevent the garment seams from leaving indentations on the skin. Improve your comfort during healing process- A proper fit and lightweight, breathable material will make you more comfortable when wearing the garment for extended periods of time …this aids compliance and speeds recovery.

Why can’t I wear active wear, traditional foundations or shapewear?

It is essential that the compression garment worn during the recovery period provides uniform radial compression, something that is not found in a standard girdle or shaper. Shapers, tights, girdles and jog bras also do not have inside flat seams, tags on the outside of the garment – away from the skin, an open crotch, and are not intended for around the clock, 24-hour use. You need a garment that is non m-marking, specifically designed to compress the skin for surgical purposes and that is comfortable for the length of your recovery. Your compression garment acts as your “second skin.”

Mannequin Make-over………..Venezuelan Mannequins Reflect National “Normal”

Eliezer Álvarez’s  mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela, where the voluptuous models are the standard

Eliezer Álvarez’s mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela, where the voluptuous models are the standard

Venezuela is known for its oil and its beautiful women.  Fueled by Venezuela beauty queens being crowned Miss Universe three times in the late 1970’s and 80’s, the country is obsessed with women’s beauty and inflated proportions.  A culture of increasingly enhanced physiques, cosmetic surgery is common practice through out Venezuela.  Breast augmentation, Butt Enhancements, and Liposuction have all contributed to the Venezuelan National “Normal”.  Yet store fronts and window displays have always used a more traditional mannequin silhouette to display clothing. That was until Eliezer Álvarez’s made voluptuous models the standard in his mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela.  Now his best seller,the augmented forms can be found in store presentations through out the country echoing the Venezuelan physique.

Enhancing your female form?  Cosmetic surgery can allow you to sculpt a body that reflects your desires.  The breasts, abdominals, thighs, hips, buttocks, flanks and upper back can all be enhanced by today’s modern procedures.  Designed to address the specific aesthetic or reconstructive procedure, each Contemporary Design Compression Garment is an integral element in the surgical process. To ensure the results of your procedure, each garment is designed to hold skin firmly in place, aiding in proper skin retraction and intended body contouring.  Wearing a compression garment designed for your particular procedure will minimize bruising and swelling, increase blood circulation and aid in flushing fluids and toxins at the incision site.

CDI Above the Knee Body Shaper

Post surgery, the use of a supportive compression garment is an integral element in the healing process.

 

Where do I find Post Op Compression Garments?

1-perfectfitContemporary Design Inc. has been proud to set a standard of excellence in the compression garments and post-op garment industry since 1986. By offering a full line of well-designed compression garments, a range of sizes up to 3X, and our exclusive Expander Sizer, Contemporary Design Inc. ensures our garments are a Perfect Fit for you and your patients. And, with our ability to offer outstanding customer service, competitive pricing, and same-day shipping, CDI is indeed the Perfect Fit for all of your facility’s post-op needs.

 

Contemporary Design’s wide range of post surgical compression garments has been shown to support uniform skin shrinkage, an increase in venous and lymphatic drainage, and a noticeable reduction in wound edema. Our fabrics, including the exciting edition of our newest line, Sculptures, are latex-free and provide a comfortable, lightweight fit that ensures universal compression. Ultimately, these fabrics, combined with innovative garment engineering and extensive market research, enhance the results of cosmetic, corrective and contouring procedures.

Size Calculator

We’ve all done it….You’ve lugged armfuls of dresses to the fitting room, only to find the size that fit you in the last store you were in, doesn’t even make it over your hips. Vanity sizing or not, finding the right size isn’t as easy as it seems.  History, fashion trend, pride, and yes, vanity have all played a part in this confusion. 

Finding the correct size effects appearance and morale as well as, product longevity.  When finding the correct post surgical compression wear, sizing may also affect your health.  Follow the easy steps below to calculate your size “starting point”.   Height and weight, as well as, dress size are all factors in determining the proper fit.

 

When taking these measurements, use a cloth tape measure, not a metal one. Make sure that, when you circle your chest, waist, or hips, the tape is level and neither too tight nor too loose. Also measure yourself on your bare skin, not over clothes. And this may sound silly, but don’t trust your memory — be sure to write the measurements down!   

Not sure about all this?  It may seem impossible to take them yourself and get an accurate read, so find someone you trust, swear them to secrecy, and start measuring.

  • Waist: Measure the circumference of your waist. Use the tape to circle your waist (sort of like a belt would) at   your natural waistline, which is located above your belly button and below your rib cage. (If you bend to the side, the crease that forms is your natural waistline.) Don’t suck in your stomach, or you’ll get a false measurement.

Tip:  Not really sure where your natural waist is …or went?   (It does change with age, etc..)  Dress in your underwear or a leotard, and tie a narrow ribbon or a piece of elastic around your waist, but not too tight. Move around a little bit until the elastic or ribbon finds your natural waistline. This may not be where you wear the waistband of your jeans or favorite pair of slacks.

Your recommended bra size is Don’t be alarmed if this size is different from what you are used to, most women are wearing the wrong size bra! Your recommended bra size is a great starting point to finding bras that will fit you perfectly. The best size for you may vary based on the bra brand, style or other factors.

  • Hips: Measure the circumference of your hips. Start at one hip and wrap the tape measure around your rear, around the other hip, and back to where you started. Make sure the tape is over the largest part of your buttocks, (usually approximately 7 inches below the natural waistline). Because making sure the tape is level in the back can be hard, do it in front of a mirror; or again get someone else to take your measurements.
  • Bicep Circumference: Measure the circumference of your arm. Wrap the tape measure around the widest part of your upper arm from front to back and around to the start point.
 

Wearing the right bra does wonders for your figure, makes you feel more confident and comfortable, and is best for your breast health.  Determining the correct size, again, has baffled us all.

  • Bra Band Size: With your bra on, measure firmly around your rib cage, directly underneath your breasts. The tape measure should be horizontal around your body and should not drop in the back. This is your underbust or band measurement. Example: 38″
  • Cup Size: Measure the circumference of your chest. Place one end of the tape measure at the fullest part of your bust, wrap it around (under your armpits, around your shoulder blades, and back to the front) to get the measurement. This is your cup size measurement. Example: 41″

Subtract the band size from the bust size. Example:41″-38″=3″  Use that number to get your cup sizeExample: 3″= C cup

2″ = B cup, 6″ = DDD cup
3″ = C cup 7″ = F cup
4″ = D cup 8″ = G cup
5″ = DD cup 9″ = H cup
  • Your bra size is your band size plus your cup size. Example: 38C

Knowing how to measure yourself correctly and getting the right size for your garment is the most crucial step of selecting a post surgical compression garment.

How a Garment should feel.

Working with your doctor, personal preference, and type of procedures your compression garment specialist will ensure your compression garment is the correct size and will meet expectations.

Snug on the body, feeling like it is compressing the dermal layer into the muscle wall.

Although snug, the fit should be comfortable enough not to impede normal breathing or restrict the patient’s movement.  In addition, the patient’s body type can be accommodated.  A patient with a full thigh might find a garment with a longer leg more comfortable than a mid-thigh version.

Note:  athletic wear, shapewear yoga wear or lingerie will not offer the proper level of compression needed after a surgical procedure.

The Role of POST-OPERATIVE COMPRESSION GARMENTS Selecting the Right Compression Garments

 Designed to address the specific aesthetic or reconstructive procedure each medical compression garment targets the incision site, adjacent area and depending on the procedure, possibly the area below the surgery. BodyScan technology Hook and eye closings underneath the zippers assist in applying the garment immediately after surgery. A cushioned zipper guard tape, positioned under the hook and eye closures eliminates pinching or scratching the skin.

Adjustable shoulder straps are necessary to accommodate the changes in fluid accumulation during the healing process.  This aids in positioning the garment properly, comfort and accurate compression.

Garments targeting the lower portion of the body, (without shoulder straps,) require a wide waistband to prevent rolling, bunching, or sliding…and insure a proper fit..CDI offers a waistband of 2”, 4” or 6”(ideal for tall patients).

 

A reinforced anatomically correct crotch is an essential part of compression wear design. Due to gravity’s pull; the accumulated fluids, post-op, flow downward.  Proper support to the pelvic bone is needed to reduce the possibility of edema in the genitals; hence the garment opening in the crotch area is relatively small.  A small, flexible plastic funnel positioned close to the perineum when urinating will prevent accidental splashing onto the garment. Tags are always located on the exterior of the garment for patient  comfort, reducing skin irritation.

 

Fabric:

Sculptures Compression Wear is made utilizing two anti-microbrial, self wicking, memory resilient fabrics. Open weave allows air flow, construction maintains integrity after being cut or pierced.

-accommodates holes made for drain and intravenous tubes.

 

Wash and wear / quick dry time spandex and nylon, light weight, breathable, moisture wicking 100% latex and rubber free…  No allergic reaction, no formaldehyde. Each garment is made to withstand stress over extended time, providing consistent and continuous compression. Fabric Memory ensures the garment returns to orig. shape after laundering.

 

CDI uses a specialized surging machine to create a flat stitch, eliminating tissue marking, itching and skin irritation.  This flat stitch is an extremely strong seam, undetectable under outer clothing.  The seam is the natural weak point in garment construction.  Our flat seam is durable and ensures that the garment will not be compromised due to stress, promising consistent compression needed for recovery. Note: A seam should never be located at an incision site to prevent undo pressure on the body resulting in severe discomfort.

 

How a Garment should feel.

Working with your doctor, personal preference, and type of procedures your compression garment specialist will ensure your compression garment will meet expectations.

Snug on the body, feeling like it is compressing the dermal layer into the muscle wall.

Although snug, the fit should be comfortable enough not to impede normal breathing or restrict the patient’s movement.  In addition, the patient’s body type can be accommodated.  A patient with a full thigh might find a garment with a longer leg more comfortable than a mid-thigh version.

Note:  athletic wear, shapewear yoga wear or lingerie will not offer the proper level of compression needed after a surgical procedure

 

Your doctor will determine the length of time a patient should wear a compression garment.  On average three weeks to three months is recommended.

 

Post surgery (for 3-4 weeks) the compression garment should be worn at all times, removing only to shower or bathe.  Because the body will quickly swell due to water entering the surgical area, it is recommended a second compression garment be replaced immediately after bathing and the original hand laundered and air dried. 

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