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Posts tagged ‘FITTING’

Historic Moments in the Development of Shapewear

OldDesignShop_FrenchCorset1895-220x300Segregating the classes – Corsets (with boning made of whale bone, horn, or metal) elongated the torso, trimmed the silhouette, and improved the posture of regal 16th century aristocrats.

With revolution in the air during the late 18th century, royals set aside their corsets and panniers (false hips up to six feet wide!  The goal – to reconnect with the peasants in their simple attire.

1828 saw the invention of the metal eyelet, enabling corsets to be laced even tighter, again the wisp waste was in fashion.  Unfortunately the corset’s constriction of the torso brought on ailments ranging from shortness of breath to liver damage and tuberculosis.

The Edwardian Gibson Girls of the early 1900s favored the “health corset”.  Designed to avoid constriction of the lungs, the garment drew a nipped waist but threw the spin forward, into an unnatural S- shape with a memorable behind.

The roaring 20’s slim silhouette and shorter hemline introduced a bust to thigh pull on girdle made of rubber or elastic.

Dior ushered in “The New Look” (my favorite!) in 1947. A strapless garment with paneled construction and garters was a must to creating the wasp-wasted image popular through the next decade.

The 1960s brought panty hose, freedom, and the women’s revolution.

1998 Sara Blakely and SPANX introduced shapewear as smooth as a second skin.

Today stretch rules!  Shapewear that pinches, pokes, and digs into the skin are all in the past; thanks to BodyScan technology and 21st century fabrics and construction.

Size Calculator

We’ve all done it….You’ve lugged armfuls of dresses to the fitting room, only to find the size that fit you in the last store you were in, doesn’t even make it over your hips. Vanity sizing or not, finding the right size isn’t as easy as it seems.  History, fashion trend, pride, and yes, vanity have all played a part in this confusion. 

Finding the correct size effects appearance and morale as well as, product longevity.  When finding the correct post surgical compression wear, sizing may also affect your health.  Follow the easy steps below to calculate your size “starting point”.   Height and weight, as well as, dress size are all factors in determining the proper fit.

 

When taking these measurements, use a cloth tape measure, not a metal one. Make sure that, when you circle your chest, waist, or hips, the tape is level and neither too tight nor too loose. Also measure yourself on your bare skin, not over clothes. And this may sound silly, but don’t trust your memory — be sure to write the measurements down!   

Not sure about all this?  It may seem impossible to take them yourself and get an accurate read, so find someone you trust, swear them to secrecy, and start measuring.

  • Waist: Measure the circumference of your waist. Use the tape to circle your waist (sort of like a belt would) at   your natural waistline, which is located above your belly button and below your rib cage. (If you bend to the side, the crease that forms is your natural waistline.) Don’t suck in your stomach, or you’ll get a false measurement.

Tip:  Not really sure where your natural waist is …or went?   (It does change with age, etc..)  Dress in your underwear or a leotard, and tie a narrow ribbon or a piece of elastic around your waist, but not too tight. Move around a little bit until the elastic or ribbon finds your natural waistline. This may not be where you wear the waistband of your jeans or favorite pair of slacks.

Your recommended bra size is Don’t be alarmed if this size is different from what you are used to, most women are wearing the wrong size bra! Your recommended bra size is a great starting point to finding bras that will fit you perfectly. The best size for you may vary based on the bra brand, style or other factors.

  • Hips: Measure the circumference of your hips. Start at one hip and wrap the tape measure around your rear, around the other hip, and back to where you started. Make sure the tape is over the largest part of your buttocks, (usually approximately 7 inches below the natural waistline). Because making sure the tape is level in the back can be hard, do it in front of a mirror; or again get someone else to take your measurements.
  • Bicep Circumference: Measure the circumference of your arm. Wrap the tape measure around the widest part of your upper arm from front to back and around to the start point.
 

Wearing the right bra does wonders for your figure, makes you feel more confident and comfortable, and is best for your breast health.  Determining the correct size, again, has baffled us all.

  • Bra Band Size: With your bra on, measure firmly around your rib cage, directly underneath your breasts. The tape measure should be horizontal around your body and should not drop in the back. This is your underbust or band measurement. Example: 38″
  • Cup Size: Measure the circumference of your chest. Place one end of the tape measure at the fullest part of your bust, wrap it around (under your armpits, around your shoulder blades, and back to the front) to get the measurement. This is your cup size measurement. Example: 41″

Subtract the band size from the bust size. Example:41″-38″=3″  Use that number to get your cup sizeExample: 3″= C cup

2″ = B cup, 6″ = DDD cup
3″ = C cup 7″ = F cup
4″ = D cup 8″ = G cup
5″ = DD cup 9″ = H cup
  • Your bra size is your band size plus your cup size. Example: 38C

Knowing how to measure yourself correctly and getting the right size for your garment is the most crucial step of selecting a post surgical compression garment.

How a Garment should feel.

Working with your doctor, personal preference, and type of procedures your compression garment specialist will ensure your compression garment is the correct size and will meet expectations.

Snug on the body, feeling like it is compressing the dermal layer into the muscle wall.

Although snug, the fit should be comfortable enough not to impede normal breathing or restrict the patient’s movement.  In addition, the patient’s body type can be accommodated.  A patient with a full thigh might find a garment with a longer leg more comfortable than a mid-thigh version.

Note:  athletic wear, shapewear yoga wear or lingerie will not offer the proper level of compression needed after a surgical procedure.

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